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Identity and resurrective ideology in an age of trauma.

The author extends his conception of emotional trauma as a shattering of the tranquilizing “absolutisms of everyday life” that shield us from our finitude and our existential vulnerability, to a consideration of collective trauma. Using the collective trauma of 9/11 and its aftermath as his prime example, he illustrates how traumatized people fall prey to “resurrective ideologies” that promise to restore the sheltering illusions that have been lost. He suggests that an alternative to these grandiose illusions can be found in our “kinship-in-finitude.” (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Psychoanalytic Psychology)

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On the longing for home.

The psychoanalytic literature has not been particularly attentive to the longing for home, this despite the fact that it has been central to the organizing narratives of the Western world since ancient times. Indeed, a nonpathological mourning for a lost home and efforts both real and symbolic to return would appear to be universals in human experience. The author examines the longing for home by presenting a series of narratives drawn from sources both heroic and quotidian in a kind of theme and variations. Appreciation of and clinical attentiveness to the longing for home would do much to broaden the understanding and investigation of some of our most important psychoanalytic ideas—even, and surprisingly, the Oedipus complex. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)…

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Knowing oneself from the inside out, knowing oneself from the outside in: The “inner” and “outer” worlds and their link through action.

This paper illuminates how the “inner world” of wishes, fantasies, affects, and self- and object-representations and the “outer world” of overt behavior and social reality continuously and reciprocally co-create each other. Basing its presentation both on case material and theoretical analysis, it demonstrates the limitations of a linear, archaeological theoretical vision of surface and depths. In its place, the paper shows how daily life and conscious and unconscious subjective organization mutually shape and maintain each other and in the process maintain the individual’s dominant personality patterns. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved) (Source: Psychoanalytic Psychology)

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